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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
that year coming up just a week later, israel invaded egypt. and they did it with the secret support of two major u.s. allies. france and england. it was a fight over control of the suez canal. the american president at that time, in 1956, was, of course, dwight eisenhower. republican. he was running for re-election against the democratic candidate that year, adlai stevenson. talk about an october surprise. that year it was eight days before election day. both candidates are forced to deal with an unexpected and genuine giant foreign policy crisis. >> on sunday the israeli government ordered total mobilization. on monday, their armed forces penetrated deeply into egypt and to the vicinity of the suez canal, nearly 100 miles away. and on tuesday, the british and french governments delivered a 12-hour ultimatum to israel and egypt, now followed up by armed attack against egypt. the united states was not consulted in any way about any phase of these actions. nor were we informed of them in advance. >> president eisenhower sounding kind of mad, right? the u.s. had not been informed about the at
. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted their sources but also hearing seniors, including the arab league, suggests that leadership of various countries and organizations are coming to the region for an announcement which the vetting is that this evening hillary clinton will be meeting israeli prime minister and the betting is at that time the ceas
this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months before rebel fighters took down that regime and ousted and then killed gadhafi. sometimes governments have also blocked access to the internet in smaller, more directed ways like pakistan and bangladesh turning off youtube this year on account of that insane islamophobic video that sparked protests across the muslim world. just this week the government in tajikistan turned off facebook after people started posting mean things on facebook about the president of tajikistan who apparently is a wuss. pakistan, they blocked twitter for a day because of a, quote, blasphemous cartoon contest. this kind of thing happens. government shuts off parts of the internet or the whole darn thing. because this is a thing governments do to their people, preserving access to the internet and means of communication that the internet affords us, that has become a significant part of the way the u.s. interacts with other countries. it's become a si
. now to egypt where the country's new president is winning big-time praise from the u.s. for helping to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the ne
for themselves. when you look at nations in transition like afghanistan and egypt, people there say they're concerned more about continuity and aid. they have worries about what getting to know a new administration would mean for them. in europe, it's about economic growth. in fact, a poll was done across europe showed 75% of europeans would choose obama, in places like germany, 92%. if you look at israel, say, the landslide there if the election happened there would be romney's. there's been a lot of support for him after he visited and he's expressed vocal support for any potential israeli action against iran's nuclear facilities. veroni veronica? >> interesting. michelle kosinski, we appreciate it. >>> msnbc will have special edesk day coverage throughout the day tomorrow. we'll bring you the best primetime coverage at 6:00 eastern with rachel maddow and chris matthews. >>> and now for a look at the weather and that nor'easter that's headed our way. nbc meteorologist bill karins is down in democracy plaza for us. he got the good assignment this morning. >> good monday morning. a beaut
thing. >> jonathan capehart. >> i learned president morsi of egypt is fanatical about "planet of the apes." >> that is really all you need to know. jonathan, thank you so much. rana, steve, michael and everybody, thank you for watching today. if it's "way too early," it's "morning joe." chuck todd is next with "the daily rundown." >>> together again. mitt romney makes his way to the white house. it's not exactly the way he wanted to get there. but can something constructive come out of a private lunch between president obama and the man he defeated just three weeks ago? that's right. that was just three weeks ago. >>> also this morning, a deep dive into america's longest war. look into lessons learned and the sacrifices made by troops at one combat outpost. tell us about what's been accomplished and what's not in more than a decade of fighting. as the country wakes up obsessed with numbers and winners, for the lottery, that, we've got a very important update on the election night numbers that gave us a winner. they've been changing steadily as the states keep on counting. and
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)